Lift Chairs

Your Favorite Recliner Chair for Now and Later

Lift Chairs

If you or someone you love is nearing retirement age (or perhaps has already retired), this is a great time to begin putting plans into action to age in your own home. Everyone knows that a great recliner is one of the most critical pieces of furniture right now and as you grow older. It makes perfect sense to enjoy your favorite chair right now—and have it already in place as you begin to lose mobility. One of the great Power Lift Reclining Chairs can be your favorite thing to come home to relax in now, and it will serve you well throughout your remaining years.  

With two highly rated Lift Chair makers, Pride Mobility and Gold Technologies, in our line-up, AccessNSM can help you find the perfect fit for you and your needs. There are ten sizes available so every person can find a custom fit for their body size and shape—from the most petite to Extra Tall and Extra Wide. A good fit is half the battle in finding your perfect new favorite chair. Yet there is so much more to finding a chair that will serve you now and later.

There are multiple positions your new power lift chair can place you in, depending on the activity you are doing. A power button can easily switch from one position to another. Perhaps you want to relax and watch a football game, or sit up to eat, read, or do a craft. If you need to take a nap, you can even lie flat. You can have your feet up in multiple positions or place them on the floor. So you can relax and get comfortable now. Think about later: when it’s hard to get up out of your favorite chair. A simple touch of a button automatically raises you to a standing position. You may need to sleep in your chair to keep a certain body part elevated; you may spend more time in your chair than in bed as you get older. You won’t have to depend on someone to assist you out of your chair or to change positions. It is all powered by controls that allow you to control your movements in your favorite chair in your own home.

Consider getting your new favorite chair now. You get to pick the color, fabric, style. It will fit your body like a glove. You can begin enjoying your chair now and for years to come.

Door Openers for disabilities

4 Ways an Automatic Door Opener Can Make Your Home More Accessible

Door Openers

If you or your loved one are finding ways to live in your home despite mobility issues, installing an automatic door opener may be a huge solution for easier entry and access. If you are using a manual or powered wheelchair, power scooter, walker, knee scooter, or cane, you already know what a challenge opening and going through doors can be. You either have to finagle ways to attempt your way through a door, hoping it won’t close in the midst of your passing through—or wait for someone to open and hold the door for you. An Automatic Door Opener can be the simple solution you are looking for. Here are just four ways a door opener can open up your world for you:

Door Opener Wall Switches

Independence

You can simply push a button and the Automatic Door Opener will open up, pause to give you time to safely pass through, then slowly close behind you. There is no longer the need to wait for someone else to hold the door for you. This may mean you can live more independently, coming and going as you please. Automatic Door Openers can be installed on both exterior and interior doors, making it easy to move freely throughout your own home without assistance.

Security

An Automatic Door Opener can unlatch a locked door, as well as open it for you. After passing smoothly through the open door, it closes behind you and locks again. You can count on the safety and security of these commercial-grade auto door openers. Where there is no door opener, after struggling to get through, you still have to turn around and try to close and lock the door. What a sense of relief and peace to know you can simply push a button to unlock, open, pass through, and the door will close and lock behind you.

Customized Access

The remotes control access can be customized depending on your particular disability. The “Open” button can be installed on a nearby wall or post. A remote with buttons can also be attached to the users’ wheelchair. There are other options if hands cannot be used for the remote controls.

Multiple Uses

An Automatic Door Opener can be used on more than just the front door. One can be installed to open a gate, garage or shed door, a bedroom door, or office. Wherever there is a door in your home that is an obstacle for you or your loved one with any type of mobility challenge, An Automatic Door Opener can be used to make it easy to glide through any doorway. It is another important accessibility tool.

mobility ramps

Wheelchair Ramps are Not Only for Wheelchairs

Wheelchair and scooter ramps

When you think of Wheelchair Ramps, you automatically think of them for wheelchair use. However, ramps are a critical safety apparatus for multiple users in your home, church, school or business. A ramp is much safer and easier to use than stairs for anyone with any type of mobility issue. Think of the various people and equipment which may need to access your steps or change in elevation. A safe even slope is much better to navigate than steps are. A ramp greatly reduces fall risks when compared to steps. Ramps are relatively inexpensive and come in a variety of materials, depending on your application and the amount of traffic it needs to carry. There are appealing Ramps designed for interior or exterior use. Consider how welcome and helpful a Ramp (instead of steps) would be for these users:

 

  • Anyone using a Rollator or Walker of any type.
  • A young family pushing an infant stroller and trying to help a toddler at the same time.
  • Someone using crutches due to a foot or leg injury.
  • An elderly person (even without the assistance of a walker) who is already a high fall risk.
  • A person recovering from hip, foot or knee surgery using a knee scooter.
  • A shopper going in or out the door while bags obscure their vision and offset their balance.
  • Someone who is weak from illness or chemo treatments.
  • One who suffers from vertigo or poor balance.
  • A busy toddler who runs ahead of parents.
  • When weather conditions make stairs unsafe.
  • An expectant mother whose balance is not in peak performance.
  • Any type of delivery that requires carrying boxes by hand or a handtruck.
  • Those who are on oxygen or have breathing issues which leaves them easily winded.
  • Anyone weak from heart problems or other health challenges who cannot safely navigate steps.

Wheelchair Ramp

The useful ways mobility ramps are used is endless. It’s true that there are hundreds of thousands in America who use manual or power wheelchairs, as well as power scooters, who depend on ramps to access homes, churches, businesses, clinics, parks, malls, offices. Yet when you really think about it, millions of other people need ramps for various reasons, as well.

Accessible Solutions for Bathrooms

The Most Dangerous Room for the Mobility Challenged- Bathrooms

Bathrooms are usually the smallest room in the house, but they can be the biggest safety risk for those with any type of mobility challenge. Most likely, there’s a dangerous combination of wet tile floors, slippery tubs, difficulty getting up from a seated position after toileting and cramped space. Add to that mix, the loss of privacy and independence when help is required for those with mobility limitations. The bathroom may be a necessity but it is not a room to be looked forward to by the person who needs help or the caregiver. The bathroom can be an accident waiting to happen (in more ways than one!)

There are some simple changes that can be made in your bathroom to make it easier to access, safer and even offer more independence to use:

Grab Bars

Grab Bars– There is a wide selection of grab bars which can be installed in strategic places near the toilet and tub to aide in getting up and down, as well as having something to hold on to instead of falling.

Shower Chairs

Shower chairs– Multiple models are available to aide in getting safely in the shower or tub—including benches which allow the patient to sit down outside the tub and slide into the tub while seated.

Toilet Accessories

Toilet Accessories– There are portable bedside commodes, raised toilet seats, over commode bars which have stable arm rests to aide in standing up.

Walk-In Bath Tubs

Walk In Tubs– These are great for the safest baths. There is no need to raise legs over the tub. Just walk in, close the door and sit down.

Patient Lifts– When the patient has little to no mobility, a lift can be installed to make transferring to the toilet or bath safer and easier on both patient and caregiver.

Bath Remodels– There are times, the existing bathroom has so many issues for the mobility challenged person, that an Accessibility Professional needs to be involved in making major changes in your bathroom.

Don’t forget to place slip resistant mats or stickers in your bathtub, spray air freshener above toilet instead of on the floor causing a fall risk, and remove throw rugs which can trip someone up. Take a good look at your bathroom to see what small or larger changes need to be made. Get the input from an Occupational Therapist or Accessibility Professional for personalized input on making your bathroom less dangerous.

Homecare patient lift

Patient Lifts- A Vital Accessibility Tool for Homes

Patient Lifts

If you are caring for a loved one with severe mobility issues in your home, no one but you knows how challenging it can be. Even when it is a labor of love, it means a sacrifice of your time, energy and life. It doesn’t mean you have to sacrifice your back. One of the most dangerous parts of caregiving is assisting with lifting and transferring. The chronic wear and tear on your musculoskeletal system can be disabling to the caregiver. Sometimes, it can happen with just one wrong move! That’s why it is critical to have the correct patient lift in your home to prevent injury to the caregiver and to the patient.

Studies have proven that the proper use of a patient lift can prevent career-changing injuries to nurses, aides, therapists and professional caregivers. That’s why more and more clinical settings use these vital tools. No one but a caregiver realizes how physically hard it is to safely move a patient. In clinical settings, most pros know to call for help when lifting or transitioning. Even with extra people, it can be an injury–in-the-making. When you are the sole caregiver at home, you cannot always call for extra manpower to move a mobility-challenged patient.

Ask an Accessibility Professional to help you choose the proper Patient Lift for your unique situations- depending on the size, weight, disability and location of the patient you will be lifting. The correct Patient Lift can greatly reduce injury, stress, and amount of time to lift or move your loved one. Perhaps your loved one has a spinal injury, is a stroke or heart patient,  or is limited by a genetic issue. There are Patient Lifts such as:

  • For toileting and hygiene use.
  • Portable Floor lifts which can be moved from room to room
  • Overhead lifts that are permanently anchored in the ceiling to lift patient to change bedding, transition, and lower to a wheelchair.
  • Patient Lifts on tracks that glide from room to room.
  • Bariatric lifts (for heavier patients)
  • Therapeutic Lifts (sit-to-stand, walking, etc.)
  • Power Lift Chairs (home recliners and for access in and out of vehicles)

Finding the proper Patient Lift for your loved one at home can make so much difference in the quality of everyday life—for both the patient and caregiver. A quick safe transfer means more time for other activities. Some lifts offer more independence for both the patient and caregiver. Finding a good Patient Lift can be helpful no matter what the age, illness, or disability is. It can mean the difference in being able to care safely for a loved one in your own home.

home modifications for disabilities

Home Modifications for the Disabled

home modifications for disabilities

There may need to be some changes made in your present home to accommodate the use of a wheelchair. Often a few simple changes can make life so much easier and allows the disabled person using the wheelchair to be as independent as possible. These modifications can be as simple as installing grab bars in the bathroom or as detailed as building an attached apartment for the person in the
wheelchair or possibly for their caregiver. These modifications could be temporary if the patient is expected to regain strength and use of legs, or the changes to your home may need to be more permanent to provide long-term accessibility for someone with more permanent disabilities. Here a few possible Home modifications to consider when planning for a child, adult or aging person who uses a wheelchair to move around:

  • Install lever faucet handles which can be easily reached to flip on/off instead of turning a knob on/off by twisting.
  • Put in grab bars to help with safe movement in the bath and by the toilet. Grab bars can even be installed to assist in getting out of bed.
  • Use automatic door openers so the person in a wheelchair can use controls to open doors. These automatic openers can be used for interior and exterior doors, as well as gates.
  • In some cases, doorways need to be widened for easier passage through with a wheelchair. You can place a threshold ramp over a rough or bumpy threshold to make for smooth passage.
  • Wheelchair ramps are one of the most common modifications where there is a change in elevation. They are available in various materials, for residential and commercial use and allow easy entrance and exit.
  • Increase lighting and remove throw rugs to reduce falls.
  • Consider putting in a security system to protect and to be able to call for help if needed.
  • Where existing stairs make certain areas inaccessible to the person in a wheelchair, you can install a stairlift, an inclined platform lift or a Vertical Platform Lift which is also referred to as a Wheelchair elevator.
  • Kitchen counters can be lowered for easier access for the person in a wheelchair or a Jazzy Air Chair can be used that raises and lowers the person in the actual wheelchair.
  • Walk-in tubs, and transfer benches and lifts can all be considered to make bath time easier and safer.

When considering home modifications to make life more accessible for a disabled person in a wheelchair, remember aging and some diseases are progressive. So plan modifications remembering that what they can do today might not be a capability 5-10 years from now. It is helpful to have an Occupational Therapist or an accessibility professional evaluate your home for your particular needs. There are a lot of changes that will make life so much easier in your own home.